Archives of General Internal Medicine

Reach Us +44 1202068036

APHTHOUS LESIONS IN A CELIAC POPULATION: AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY

Joint Event on World Congress on EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH & International Conference on TROPICAL MEDICINE, INFECTIOUS DISEASES & PUBLIC HEALTH
December 12 -13 , 2018 | Abu Dhabi ,UAE

Cinzia Casu, Carla Mannu and Riccardo Botta

Private Practice, Italy

Posters & Accepted Abstracts : Arch Gen Intern Med

DOI: 10.4066/2591-7951-C7-021

Abstract:

Oral aphthous ulcers are common lesions of the oral mucosa. Celiac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disease in which individuals exhibit damages in the small intestine villi as a consequence of an abnormal immune response subsequent to the ingestion of gluten. The aim is to report the percentage of aphthous lesions in a celiac population of 212 patients. Inclusion criteria were CD assessed with histological examination, aged between 6 and 12 years. Patients who showed aphthous lesions at the moment of the oral examination were recorded and the patients were interviewed to find out if they had had other episodes of ulcers in the last 2 years. 84 patients had no episodes of mouth ulcers during the last 2 years (39.5%) while 128 had at least one episode of canker sores (60.5%). In 45 these are localized in the upper vestibular mucosa (35%), in 31 in the lower vestibular mucosa (24%). In 25 patients, lesions were localized in the tongue (20%), in 15 patients on the cheek (11.5%) and in 12 cases in the floor of the mouth (9,5%). Discussion. Saraceno et al. found that RAS appear in 69% of the CD patients, compared to the 43% in the control group. In a work of Campisi et al. the prevalence of oral soft tissues lesions was 42% in the coeliac disease patients and 2% in controls. The results of our study is partially in accordance with previous epidemiological studies. The difference in Italian diet could be explain the difference of the epidemiological values in the literature. The importance of the correlation between aphthous lesion and CD is the basis of study protocols that include observation of the oral cavity as a means of screening for celiac disease.

Biography:

Cinzia Casu has completed a master’s degree in Biological Sciences obtained with honors at the University of Cagliari – Italy. She worked 2 years to Oral Biotechnology Laboratory (OBL) and to DNA Sequencing Service (DSS), University of Cagliari. From 2012 to present (six years) she worked in the diabetes unit in the St Michele Hospital, Cagliari, as a researcher about Type 1 Diabetes, and as a local Clinical Study Coordinator of clinical trial and as a clinical data manager. She, in addition to running diabetes research still working with several dentists in the field of related diseases. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

E-mail: [email protected]

PDF HTML