Journal of Mental Health and Aging

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Opinion Article - Journal of Mental Health and Aging (2022) Volume 6, Issue 3

Cultural differences in depression and anxiety clinical presentation.

Asuka Jhon*

Department of Public Health, Aichi Prefectural College of Nursing and Health, Japan

Corresponding Author:
Asuka Jhon
Department of Public Health
Aichi Prefectural College of Nursing and Health
Japan
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: 22-Apr-2022, Manuscript No. AAJMHA-22-63721; Editor assigned: 25-Apr-2022, PreQC No. AAJMHA-22-63721(PQ); Reviewed: 09-May-2022, QC No. AAJMHA-22-63721; Revised: 12-May-2022, Manuscript No. AAJMHA-22-63721(R); Published: 19-May-2022, DOI:10.35841/aajmha-6.3.111

Citation: Jhon A. Cultural differences in depression and anxiety clinical presentation. J Ment Health Aging. 2022;6(3):111

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Introduction

Eastern cultures function on collectivism, which emphasises on the collective and the interdependency of its members rather than any single person, in contrast to Western culture's individualistic ideals, which emphasise individual thought, achievement, and well-being. The collectivist view of the self holds that it can only be comprehended through one's social connections and affiliations. These affiliations and ties form a network in which the nuclear family has the strongest bonds, followed by extended family and close friends [1].

Although Eastern cultures' collectivism provides a powerful support structure for the community, it also presents several pressures that can contribute to despair and anxiety. The overwhelming focus on the collective rather than the individual, for example, can lead to sentiments of apathy.

Individuality and self-awareness have been gone. Depression has a long history of being tied to identity concerns like these. Furthermore, collective cultures have more regulations and social standards in place to keep the group together than individual cultures. When this is combined with the group's cohesion, social blunders can become highly public, resulting in emotions of shame and embarrassment on the part of the person who made the mistake. These emotions have been linked to social anxiety in collectivist societies, according to research. Because of the stress connected with keeping one's honour, a larger mistake that impacts one's reputation or resulting in the loss of honour has more serious implications [2].

Depression symptoms are frequently exhibited differently in collectivist society than in individualistic societies. Depression frequently results in overarching psychological distress and guilt. Guilt and distress are also signs of depression, although they can manifest themselves differently in different cultures. Pewzner-Apeloig and colleagues (1994) discovered that there were disparities in how African and Western cultures experienced depression in terms of guilt. This serves as an illustration of how differences between collectivist and individualistic societies matter. In these countries, the way depression symptoms were expressed changed [3].

The way communities deal with depression differs depending on whether they live in a collectivist or non-collectivist society. It has been demonstrated that there is a better support structure in place for individuals who need it.

Depression symptoms are frequently exhibited differently in collectivist society than in individualistic societies. Depression frequently results in overarching psychological distress and guilt. Guilt and distress are also signs of depression, although they can manifest themselves differently in different cultures. Pewzner-Apeloig and colleagues (1994) discovered that there were disparities in how African and Western cultures experienced depression in terms of guilt. This serves as an illustration of how differences between collectivist and individualistic societies matter. In these countries, the way depression symptoms were expressed changed [4].

Depression symptoms are frequently exhibited differently in collectivist society than in individualistic societies. Depression frequently results in overarching psychological distress and guilt. Guilt and distress are also signs of depression, although they can manifest themselves differently in different cultures. Pewzner-Apeloig and colleagues (1994) discovered that there were disparities in how African and Western cultures experienced depression in terms of guilt. This serves as an illustration of how differences between collectivist and individualistic societies matter. In these countries, the way depression symptoms were expressed changed [5].

Acculturation

Acculturation is the process of changing one's values, attitudes, and cultural practises in order to successfully adapt to a new culture. Acculturation is tough for any immigrants, but it is more challenging for Eastern immigrants due to the vast cultural differences between the West and the East. When Eastern immigrants come to America, the major obstacles they experience are the unexpected loss of a support structure, child rearing, and a lack of information about the American way of life. Immigrants who come from a collectivist culture that values relationships may be saddened by the loss of friends and family.

References

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