Journal of Nutrition and Human Health

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Editorial - Journal of Nutrition and Human Health (2021) Volume 5, Issue 9

Children's eating disorders

Kommoju Geethanjali*

Department of Pharmacology, Andhra University, West Godavari, Andhra Pradesh, India

*Corresponding Author:
Kommoju Geethanjali
Department of Pharmacology
Andhra University, West Godavari, Andhra Pradesh, India
Tel: + (970) 159-1905
E-mail: [email protected]

Accepted Date: September 24, 2021

Citation: Geethanjali K (2021) Children's eating disorders.. J. Nutr. Health Vol.5 No.9: 35.

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Nutrition and Human Health

Editorial

Eating disorders in adolescents and teenagers result in significant changes in eating patterns, which can lead to serious, even lifethreatening health issues. The following are the three basic types of eating disorders:

• Anorexia, a condition in which a youngster refuses to consume enough calories due to an unrealistic fear of getting overweight.

• Bulimia, a condition in which a youngster eats excessively (bingeing) and then purges the food through vomiting or the use of laxatives to avoid gaining weight.

• Binge eating, a condition in which a youngster consumes a large amount of food in a short period of time without purging.

Eating problems in children and teenagers can coexist. Some children, for example, go through bouts of anorexia and bulimia.

Eating disorders are most common in youth and early adulthood. They can, however, begin as early as childhood. Females are far more vulnerable than males. Males account for just about 5% to 15% of those suffering from anorexia or bulimia. The percentages of men who binge eat jumps to 35%.

What factors contribute to the development of eating disorders? Eating disorders are caused by a variety of factors that doctors are unable to pinpoint. They believe a mix of biological, behavioural, and social factors are at play. Young people, for example, may be influenced by societal representations that promote bodies that are too thin to be healthy. Furthermore, many children and teenagers with eating disorders face one or more of the following issues:

• Dissatisfaction

• Worry of gaining weight

• Emotions of helplessness

• Low self-esteem

Children and teenagers may develop unhealthy eating habits in order to cope with these challenges. Eating disorders frequently coexist with other psychological issues, such as the following:

Depression and anxiety disorders

• Abuse of substances

Eating problems are dangerou. Eating disorders in adolescents and teenagers can result in a variety of significant health issues, including death. Call your child's doctor straight away if you notice any of the indicators of the eating disorders listed below. Eating problems can't be cured by simple willpower.

Treatment will be required to assist your child regain his or her normal weight and eating habits. In addition, underlying psychological disorders are addressed during treatment. It's important to remember that the best results come from treating eating disorders early on.

Anorexia nervosa in children and adolescents

Anorexia affects children and teenagers, causing them to have a skewed body image. Even when they are dangerously thin, people with anorexia perceive themselves as heavy. They're preoccupied with being tiny and won't even try to maintain a healthy weight. Anorexia affects around one out of every 25 girls and women, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The majority of people will deny having an eating disorder.

Anorexia has the following symptoms

Anxiety, sadness, perfectionism, or a tendency to be overly critical of oneself

• Unusual eating habits, such as avoiding meals, eating in secret, monitoring every bite of food, or eating only certain foods.

• Intense fear of becoming fat, even if underweight.

• Menstruation that becomes infrequent or stops.

• Rapid weight loss, which the person may try to conceal with loose clothing.

• Strange eating habits, such as avoiding meals, eating in secret, monitoring every bite of food, or eating only certain foods

Get the App

unitedluxury