Journal of Mental Health and Aging

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Opinion Article - Journal of Mental Health and Aging (2022) Volume 6, Issue 5

A systematic review of strategies and results for multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pain

Philippa Collin*

Department of Mental Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Philippa Collin
Department of Mental Diseases
Duke University Medical Center, USA
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: 31-Aug-2022, Manuscript No. AAJMHA-22-81117; Editor assigned: 02-Sep-2022, Pre QC No. AAJMHA-22-81117(PQ); Reviewed: 16-Sep-2022, QC No. AAJMHA-22-81117; Revised: 19-Sep-2022, Manuscript No. AAJMHA-22-81117 (R); Published: 26-Sep-2022, DOI: 10.35841/aajmha-6.5.121

Citation: Philippa Collin. A systematic review of strategies and results for multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pain. J Ment Health Aging. 2022;6(5):121

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Abstract

For mothers, the postpartum period, particularly the first six weeks, is tremendously stressful as they try to form an emotional bond with their kid, balance their demands with those of the infant, and maintain their own excellent emotional and mental health. In the 1990s, examination of earlier research revealed potential psychological alterations during and after pregnancy, including postnatal depression, psychosis, or unhappiness. Baby blues, also known as postnatal sadness, is a mild kind of psychological distress that affects between 45 and 80 percent of new mothers and often starts on the third postpartum day Misri & Burgman. Postpartum depression (PPD), which is dependent on a woman's age and relationship, affects 10 to 43% of women, according to relevant studies.

Keywords

Mental health, Pyscological, OCD, Young people.

Introduction

Despite its rising popularity, little research has been done on how the Internet may be used to create a trustworthy community that allows help-seeking, helps eliminate stigma, and helps prevent or manage young people's mental health issues. Unsupervised internet forums and chat rooms can be dangerous for young people because they may draw adults who might exploit impressionable teenagers. Young individuals ruminating about feeling unhappy and contagion from members creating suicide pacts, detailing suicidal or self-harming intentions and tactics are other potential concerns. This essay explains the conceptualization and development [1].

Online Community Forum is a moderated message board that was created with the help of young people between the ages of 16 and 25. The Forum is run by young people, but trained moderators help and oversee it. Although little is known about the influence on stigma reduction and aid seeking in the offline world, anecdotal data from young people using the Forum suggests that it is a positive, distinctive, and beneficial online experience. There is a need for more study to determine the efficacy or potential risks of online forums in mental health prevention and early intervention work given the expansion of unsupervised forums and chat rooms [2].

Early studies claimed that as young people spent less time with others offline, growing Internet use might reduce social engagement. However, there is evidence that using the Internet can boost civic engagement. 14,15 and support social networks and pre-existing offline and online social connections. 16,17 According to young people, there are several direct connections between their online activities, particularly the information they obtain, and their day-to-day lives, who see this as a type of "social capital."

Moderators are taught to spot and address potentially dangerous messages, such as those that describe how to commit suicide or self-harm or that may in any other way be interpreted as inciting, encouraging, or triggering selfharm. These are erased, along with any medical counsel and private data. Any post that makes reference to a suicide plot or intention is regarded seriously. Moderators promptly inform the supervisor, who emails the members to emphasise the need to keep safe, point them to pertinent Reach out fact sheets, and strongly advise them to obtain resources like phone counselling or mental health professionals [3].

Reach Out for Moderators! Youth Ambassadors who are at least 18 years old and have attended one of the annual workshops on youth ambassador skills. They take part in a two-day training course based on scenarios. The Supervisors hold monthly debriefings and assist the moderators in their duties. Additionally, moderators are urged to communicate with one another via different online forum about their issues and experiences. Moderator posts aim to support and validate members' experiences, promote the usage of resources with supporting data, and encourage help-seeking. This is accomplished by persistently urging members to seek out resources - such as a mental health professional or telephone counseling and by offering them creative, alternative solutions to problems. Moderators also caution users that the Forum is not a replacement for counselling because some members access it regularly [4,5].

Conclusion

Any post that makes reference to a suicide plot or intention is regarded seriously. Moderators promptly inform the supervisor, who emails the members to emphasise the need to keep safe, point them to pertinent Reach Out! fact sheets, and strongly advise them to obtain resources like phone counselling or mental health professionals. Private messaging, a frequent feature in most forums, is disabled in order to further reduce danger, safeguard member confidentiality, and deter possible online predators.

References

  1. Flor H, Birbaumer N, Turk DC. The psychobiology of chronic pain. Adv Behav Res Ther. 1990;12(2):47-84.
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  3. Gagliese L, Melzack R. Chronic pain in elderly people. Pain. 1997;70(1):3-14.
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  5. Moseley GL. A pain neuromatrix approach to patients with chronic pain. Manual Therapy. 2003;8(3):130-40.
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  7. Przewłocki R, Przewłocka B. Opioids in chronic pain. Eur J Pharmacol. 2001;429(1-3):79-91.
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  9. Von Korff M, Ormel J, Keefe FJ, et al. Grading the severity of chronic pain. Pain. 1992;50(2):133-49.
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