Journal of Primary Care and General Practice

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.
Reach Us +12 184512974

THE EFFECT OF SHORT DURATION SKIN TO SKIN CONTACT ON PREMATURE INFANTS’ PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BEHAVIOURAL OUTCOMES: A QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Global Conference on NURSING AND HEALTHCARE
March 27-28, 2019 | Amsterdam, Netherlands

Khulood Kayed Shattnawi

Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Keynote : J Prim Care Gen Pract

Abstract:

This study aimed at assessing the effect of short duration skin to skin contact (SSC) (5 days) on preterm infants’ physiological and behavioural outcomes. A quasi-experimental control group design was utilized. 89 stable preterm infants were allocated to either an interventional or control group. Results showed that in comparison to the control group, newborns in the SSC group demonstrated higher weight gain (g/day) from day 3-5 of practicing SSC (53.7g Vs. 32.6 g; p<.05), experienced significantly fewer numbers of apneas (48% Vs. 33.3%; p=.001), and were less likely to use formula feeding (60% Vs. 90%) and more likely to use mixed feeding (formula and breastfeeding) at discharge (33.3% Vs. 10%). Significant differences were also found in the crying, and sleeping patterns of the infants; infants of mothers who practiced SSC were less likely to cry in a continuous pattern and more likely to experience good sleep than infants in the control group. The study highlights the importance of the early and short duration of SSC for preterm infants.

Biography:

Khulood Shattnawi is an assistant professor in paediatric and neonatal nursing in the faculty of nursing at Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST). She received a BS in nursing from JUST, a MS in neonatal nursing from University of Windsor/ Canada in 2001 and a PhD degree from Anglia Ruskin University, UK in 2014. Dr Shattnawi has been teaching various subjects of nursing for more than 20 years. She has held a variety of positions, including staff nurse, clinical educator, and chairperson for the maternal and child health department at the faculty of nursing/ JUST. Dr Shattnawi’ research interests are neonatal nursing with a focus on kangaroo care approach, breastfeeding preterm infants, and issues related to paediatric and adolescent health.

E-mail: [email protected]

PDF HTML
Get the App