Journal of Anesthetics and Anesthesiology

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Short Communication - Journal of Anesthetics and Anesthesiology (2023) Volume 5, Issue 2

Spinal anaesthesia: Benefits, risks, and procedure.

Maazouzi Bouallala*

Department of Cardiology

*Corresponding Author:
Maazouzi Bouallala
Department of Cardiology
Mohammed VI University Hospital Mohammed I University
Oujda, Morocco
E-mail: maazouzibouallala@gmail.com

Received:04-Mar-2023, Manuscript No. AAAA-23-97769; Editor assigned:06-Mar-2023, PreQC No. AAAA-23-97769 (PQ); Reviewed:20-Mar-2023, QC No. AAAA-23-97769; Revised:27-Mar-2023, Manuscript No. AAAA-23-97769 (R); Published:04-Apr-2023, DOI:10.35841/ aaaa-5.2.144

Citation: Bouallala M. Spinal anaesthesia: Benefits, risks, and procedure. J Anesthetic Anesthesiol. 2023;5(2):144.

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Introduction

Spinal anesthesia, also known as subarachnoid block, is a type of regional anesthesia that is commonly used for surgical procedures in the lower half of the body, including the pelvis, hips, and legs. It involves injecting local anesthetics or other medications into the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the spinal cord, leading to a temporary loss of sensation and movement in the lower body. The procedure for administering spinal anesthesia involves inserting a needle through the lower back into the subarachnoid space, which is the area between the spinal cord and the protective membranes that surround it. A small amount of local anesthetic is then injected into the cerebrospinal fluid, which quickly spreads to the nerves that supply the lower body. Spinal anesthesia is a safe and effective form of anesthesia that has several advantages over general anesthesia, including faster recovery time, less nausea and vomiting, and a lower risk of complications such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It is also less likely to cause respiratory depression, which is a potentially life-threatening side effect of opioids and other sedatives that are commonly used in general anesthesia.[1].

Spinal anesthesia is commonly used for a variety of surgical procedures, including cesarean sections, hip replacements, and lower extremity surgeries. It is also used for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, such as lumbar punctures and spinal cord injections. One potential complication of spinal anesthesia is a headache, which occurs in about 1-2% of patients. This type of headache is caused by a leak of cerebrospinal fluid through the hole created by the spinal needle. Although rare, other complications of spinal anesthesia include nerve damage, infection, and allergic reactions to the anesthetic medication. To minimize the risk of complications, it is important for patients to provide their anesthesiologist with a detailed medical history and to follow all pre-operative instructions, such as avoiding food and drink for a specified period of time before the procedure. Patients should also inform their anesthesiologist of any medications they are taking, including over-the-counter medications and herbal supplements, as some of these can interfere with the effectiveness of the anesthetic medication or increase the risk of complications. In conclusion, spinal anesthesia is a safe and effective form of anesthesia that is commonly used for surgical procedures in the lower half of the body. While it has several advantages over general anesthesia, it is important for patients to be aware of the potential risks and complications and to follow all pre-operative instructions to minimize these risks. As with any medical procedure, patients should consult with their healthcare provider to determine whether spinal anesthesia is the best option for their individual needs [2].

Spinal anesthesia, also known as subarachnoid anesthesia, is a type of regional anesthesia that involves injecting medication into the cerebrospinal fluid in the spinal canal to numb a specific area of the body. Here are some of the benefits, risks, and procedures of spinal anesthesia: It provides excellent pain relief: Spinal anesthesia is particularly effective for procedures that involve the lower abdomen, pelvis, and legs. It allows the patient to remain awake and alert: Unlike general anesthesia, spinal anesthesia doesn't put the patient to sleep. Instead, it numbs the lower half of the body while allowing the patient to remain awake and alert. It has a lower risk of complications: Compared to general anesthesia, spinal anesthesia has a lower risk of complications such as nausea, vomiting, and respiratory problems [3].

Hypotension: Spinal anesthesia can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure, which can lead to dizziness, nausea, and fainting. Headache: In some cases, spinal anesthesia can cause a headache that lasts for several days. Nerve damage: Rarely, spinal anesthesia can cause nerve damage that leads to numbness or weakness in the legs [4].

Preparation: Before the procedure, the patient will be asked to change into a hospital gown and lie on their side or sit up with their back curved forward. Local anesthesia: A local anesthetic is used to numb the skin and tissues around the injection site. Injection: A thin needle is inserted into the spinal canal, and medication is injected into the cerebrospinal fluid. Monitoring: The patient's blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen levels will be monitored throughout the procedure. Recovery: After the procedure, the patient will be moved to a recovery area, where they will be monitored for any complications. Overall, spinal anesthesia is a safe and effective option for many surgical procedures. However, it's important to discuss the risks and benefits of this procedure with your healthcare provider to determine whether it's the best option for you [5].

References

  1. Apfelbaum JL, Hawkins JL, Agarkar M, et al. . Practice guidelines for obstetric anesthesia: an updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on obstetric anesthesia and the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology∗. Anesthesiology. 2016;124(2):270-300.
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  3. Liu SS, McDonald SB. Current issues in spinal anesthesia. The Journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. 2001;94(5):888-906.
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  5. Horlocker TT. Complications of spinal and epidural anesthesia. Anesthesiology Clinics of North America. 2000;18(2):461-85.
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  7. Sklebar I, Bujas T, Habek D. Spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension in obstetrics: prevention and therapy. Acta Clinica Croatica. 2019;58(Suppl 1):90.
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  9. Neal JM, Bernards CM, Hadzic A, et al. ASRA practice advisory on neurologic complications in regional anesthesia and pain medicine.. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2008;33(5):404-15.
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