Journal of Public Health and Nutrition

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Perspective - Journal of Public Health and Nutrition (2022) Volume 5, Issue 1

Public health planning: About taking a proactive approach to preventative health.

Barba Fernando*

Department of Optometry, National Autonomous University, Mexico

Corresponding Author:
Barba Fernando
Department of Optometry
National Autonomous University, Mexico
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: 01-Jan-2022, Manuscript No. AAJPHN-22-101; Editor assigned: 04-Jan-2022, Pre QC No. AAJPHN-22-101(PQ); Reviewed: 18-Jan-2022, QC No. AAJPHN-22-101; Revised: 21-Jan-2022, Manuscript No. AAJPHN-22-101(R); Published: 28-Jan-2022, DOI: 10.35841/aajphn- 5.1.101

Citation: Fernando B. Public health planning: About taking a proactive approach to preventative health. J Pub Health Nutri. 2022; 5(1):101

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Introduction

Proactive care is defined as a continuous communication between the patient and the practitioner, as well as active monitoring of situations, in order to help prevent life-threatening emergencies. Care teams are performing proactive care when they communicate routinely with at-risk patients as well as each colleague on diseases, diagnostics, and treatment procedures while advocating preventative measures [1].

Proactive care is customized healthcare that enables people to take more responsibility of their own treatment and sensitive data by making problem prevention second nature to care teams. Patients who aren't sick may forget to check their vitals, take their prescriptions or supplements, exercise, consume nutrientrich meals suggested by their doctors, and keep their follow-up appointments. Patients are more likely to perceive their doctors as trustworthy partners and respond to polite reminders or useful warnings when clinicians on their care team check in on them on a regular basis. These bonds have the potential to last a lifetime.

By recording lifestyle modifications, encouraging selfmonitoring and sensitive data sharing, as well as arranging outpatient visits and follow-up lab testing, proactive care can enable whole-person care if done effectively. More effective outpatient visits and fruitful wellness checks result from this trust-building conversation. It enables care workers to recognise red flags and intervene to prevent serious problems. This tailored care encourages patients to stay with the practise for the rest of their lives [2].

Benefits of proactive care

Clinicians will be able to detect and manage risk factors or dysfunctions across varied groups earlier and with better agility if the industry shifts to rigorous, consistent proactive care. This will improve outcomes and save lives.

These proactive care goals may appear to be more expensive than reactive care goals, but physicians are realising that proactive treatment helps.

Health-care costs should be reduced: All it takes is quick, nimble innovation backed by policy and culture shifts in the healthcare industry. Proactive care, as contrast to reactive care, entails more than a series of reports and a data sheet.

Remove obstacles to care: This form of preventative care necessitates a 360-degree perspective of each patient as well as continuous monitoring. It analyses economic, behavioural, and social determinants of health, as well as traditional vital signs and symptoms, which frequently account for a significant portion of a patient's overall health [3]. The pandemic brought these long-hidden inequalities to light. In order to overcome those gaps, proactive care now includes specific populations who lack access to clean air and water, nutritional food, medication, transportation, and education.

Improve the quality of life: Proactive teams are masters of problem-solving agility. They communicate with patients more frequently, establishing trust and motivating them to avoid medication gaps and accurately fill out data sheets. Technical account managers use virtualization to deliver consistent, holistic Care Management, which improves health outcomes and patient retention. It also allows patients to take an active role in their own care.

Health plans

To disclose sensitive information, proactive care teams don't wait until a patient calls. They check in and ask for a datasheet or, at the very least, a text update. They can collect symptom descriptions or vital sign readings using nextgeneration technology to discover alerts that may warrant a check-up. Patients who are diagnosed or placed on the radar for a developing ailment are given sensitive information and management strategies so that they can become active participants in their care plans. Interacting with patients on a frequent basis, watching for behavioural changes and mental instability while filling prescriptions and scheduling follow-ups can help avoid serious problems from arising. Proactive care teams inquire about each patient's social determinants of health to guarantee that they will return to a safe recovery area, receive adequate nutrition and hydration, and have access to a phone, perhaps forming lifelong habits [4].

When meal and oxygen delivery, home health, or physical therapies are required, a next-generation proactive care software assists professionals with call management. Following that, physicians check in to see if the services are working and that the patient's mental state is stable enough to use them. In other words, they provide care to the full person. This will require team contact both in the office and at home when the patient is there. People frequently confide the details of their situation in one team member and never repeat them. An outpatient receptionist may be the only one who observes a patient’s dizzy spell or depressive behaviour details all team members must be alerted to. To encourage more effective whole-person wellness, these unique insights should be recognised and rewarded.

This will necessitate team contact both in the clinic and at the patient's home. People frequently confide the details of their situation in a single team member and then never mention it again. An outpatient receptionist may be the sole person who notices a patient's dizzy spell or melancholy behaviour, which must be shared with the rest of the team. To promote more effective whole-person wellness, these invaluable insights should be recognised and rewarded. Interacting with patients on a frequent basis, watching for behavioural changes and mental instability while filling prescriptions and scheduling follow-ups can help avoid serious problems from arising. Proactive care teams inquire about each patient's social determinants of health to guarantee that they will return to a safe recovery area, receive sufficient nutrition and water, and have access to a phone, which could result in the formation of lifelong habits.

A next-generation proactive care programme supports professionals with call management when meal and oxygen delivery, home health, or physical treatments are required. Physicians then check in to determine if the services are working and that the patient's mental state is stable enough for them to be used. In other words, they look after the whole individual [5]. This will necessitate team contact both in the office and at home when the patient is there. People frequently confide the details of their situation in one team member and never repeat them. An outpatient receptionist may be the only person who notices a patient's dizzy spell or melancholy behaviour, which must be reported to the rest of the team. These important findings should be recognised and rewarded.

References

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