Journal of Industrial and Environmental Chemistry

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Short Communication - Journal of Industrial and Environmental Chemistry (2022) Volume 6, Issue 4

Empirical modelling to optimize maize irrigating and supplying nitrogen in semi-arid.

Henry Thomas*

Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia.

*Corresponding Author:
Henry Thomas
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment
Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: 06-July-2022, Manuscript No. AAIEC-22-70477; Editor assigned: 08-July-2022, PreQC No. AAIEC-22-70477(PQ); Reviewed: 22-July-2022, QC No. AAIEC-22-70477; Revised: 24-July-2022, Manuscript No. AAIEC-22-70477(R); Published: 25-July-2022, DOI: 10.35841/2591-7331-6.4.116

Citation: Thomas H. Empirical modelling to optimize maize irrigating and supplying nitrogen in semi-arid. J Ind Environ Chem. 2022;6(4):116

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Introduction

Uncertainty in future accessibility of irrigation water and regulation of nutrient quantity, management ways for irrigation and atomic number 7 (N) ar essential to maximise the crop productivity. to check the response of irrigation and N on water productivity and economic come of maize (Zea mays L.) grain yield, AN experiment was conducted at Water Management research facility, University of Agriculture urban center, Asian nation in 2015 and 2016. Treatments enclosed of full and 3 reduced levels of irrigation, with four rates of N fertilization. AN empirical model was developed mistreatment ascertained grain yield for irrigation and N levels. Results from model and economic analysis showed that the N rates of 235, 229, 233, and 210 metric weight unit ha-1 were the foremost economical optimum N rates to attain the economic yield of 9321, 8937, 5748, and 3493 metric weight unit ha-1 at 100 percent, 80%, 60%, and four-hundredth irrigation levels, severally. Economic optimum N rates were additional explored to seek out out the optimum level of irrigation as a perform of the entire water applied employing a quadratic. The results showed that 520 millimeter is that the optimum level of irrigation for the complete season in 2015 and 2016. Results conjointly discovered that yield isn't considerably plagued by reducing the irrigation from full irrigation to eightieth of full irrigation [1].

The root-to-shoot magnitude relation (R/S) descended with the rising of irrigation water and atomic number 7 quantity, and also the combined treatment (W1N0) made the utmost R/S. the foundation system was primarily distributed within the 0-40 cm soil layer, within which the RWD accounted for eighty fifth of the entire RWD in 0-80 cm soil depth. There was a considerably positive relationship between RWD within the 0-40 cm and also the yield of spring wheat, RWD within the 40-60 cm had higher linear dependence on the yield of spring wheat. W2 inflated the proportion of RWD within the deep soil layer (40-60 cm). The irrigation and N rate had a big impact on biomass and grain yield of spring wheat, the biomass inflated because the N rate and water quantity inflated, W2N2 treatment made the very best grain yield, irrigation water productivity descended with increasing the irrigation quantity, and also the atomic number 7 science potency descended with increasing N rate. it had been terminated that the irrigation level W2(2400 m3.hm-2) and atomic number 7 level N2(180 kg.hm-2) might be suggested because the best combination of water and N, that promoted the foundation growth, improved grain yield, water and atomic number 7 use efficiencies of spring wheat production underneath PRB tillage within the experimental space [2].

A field experiment was conducted to look at the results of irrigation quantity on the water consumption, flag leaf physiological characteristics, and grain yield of wheat underneath the atomic number 7 application rates one hundred eighty metric weight unit x hm(-2)(N180)) and 240 metric weight unit x hm(-2)(N240). Four irrigation regimes were designed, i.e., no irrigation throughout whole growth amount (W0), irrigation with sixty millimeter water before sowing (W1), irrigation with sixty millimeter water before sowing and at jointing stage, severally (W2), and irrigation with sixty millimeter water before sowing, at jointing stage, and at flowering stage, severally (W3). In treatment W0, the water consumption quantity below a hundred cm soil layer was below that in different treatments; and in treatments W1 and W2, the water consumption quantity in 100-200 cm and 0-200 cm soil layers was over that in treatment W3. The soil water consumption quantity in 0-80 cm soil layer, the consumption proportion from flowering to maturing stage, and also the total water consumption quantity were all higher underneath N240 than underneath N180 [3].

In treatment W0, the entire water consumption quantity within the whole growth amount, the water consumption quantity from maturation to maturing stages and its proportion to the entire water consumption quantity of cluster I were below those of cluster II and cluster III, however the grain yield of cluster i used to be the very best. In treatment W1, the water consumption quantity from jointing to maturation stages and its proportion to total water consumption quantity of cluster I were below those of cluster II and cluster III, however the water consumption quantity from maturation to maturing stages had no important variations among cluster I, Group II, and cluster III. In treatment W2, the entire soil water consumption quantity, water consumption quantity from jointing to maturation stages and its proportion to total water consumption quantity of cluster I were below those of cluster II and cluster III, whereas the water consumption quantity from maturation to maturity stages and its proportion to total water consumption quantity of each cluster I and cluster III were below those of cluster II. In terms of high-yield and water-saving underneath this condition, it had been involved that the foremost applicable cultivars may comprise the cluster I with high yield and high WUE, and also the most applicable irrigation regime with high yield and tide consumption was treatment W1, i.e., irrigated sixty millimeter every time before sowing and at jointing stage [4].

Winter wheat is vulnerable by drought within the Huang-Huai- Hai Plain of China, thus, effective water-saving irrigation practices ar desperately needed to keep up its high winter wheat production. This study was conducted from 2012 to 2014 to see however supplemental irrigation (SI) affected soil wet, chemical process, and dry matter (DM) production of winter wheat by mensuration the wet in 0-20 cm (W2), 0-40 cm (W3), and 0-60 cm (W4) soil profiles. Rainfed (W0) and native SI apply (W1, irrigation with sixty millimeter every at jointing and anthesis) treatments were designed as controls. The irrigation quantity for W3 was considerably below that for W1 and W4 however over that for W2. The soil relative water content (SRWC) in 0-40 cm soil profiles at jointing when SI for W3 was considerably below that for W1 and W4 however over that for W2. W3 exhibited lower SRWC in 100- 140 and 60-140 cm soil profiles at maturation when SI and at maturity, severally, however higher root length density in 60- 100 cm soil profiles than W1, W2 and W4 [5].

References

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