Journal of Cell Biology and Metabolism

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Editor Note - Journal of Cell Biology and Metabolism (2021) Volume 3, Issue 2

Dengue-causes, symptoms and treatment.

Rosy Franco*

Managing Editor, Journal of Cell Biology and Metabolism, United States

Corresponding Author:
Rosy Franco
Managing Edtitor Journal of Cell Biology and Metabolism United Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]

Accepted date: April 10, 2021

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Cell Biology and Metabolism

Editorial Note

Dengue infection spread to individuals through the contaminated Aedesspecies (Ae. aegypti or Ae. albopictus) mosquito. It is very common in more than 100 countries throughout the world. Dengue is usually the major cause for illness in areas with risk. It is caused when a mosquito bites an infected person, picks the virus then bites somebody else, thus passing the virus from one person to other person. It’s a virus infection which causes fever and other symptoms. The disease affects infants, young and adults equally. This suggests everyone in your family needs protection from the mosquitoes. As referenced previously, the dengue infection is spread by mosquitoes, mainly the Aedes mosquito. These mosquitoes are known to bite early within the morning and late within the night. Side effects, which ordinarily start 4-6 days after disease and keep going for as long as 10 days, may incorporate - Abrupt, high fever, Severe migraines, Pain behind the eyes, Severe joint and muscle torment, Fatigue, Nausea, Vomiting, Skin rash, which seems from 2-5 days after the beginning of fever, Mild dying (such a nose drain, draining gums, or simple wounding). Mostly adults and others who haven't had the disease before will in general have milder cases than more established kids and grown-ups. In some of the cases, significant issues can aroused and these incorporate dengue haemorrhagic fever, an uncommon difficulty portrayed by high fever, harm to lymph and veins, seeping from the nose and gums, amplification of the liver, and disappointment of the cardiovascular framework. The symptoms may reach massive bleeding, shock, and death. This is often called Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). People with weakened immune systems also as those with a second or subsequent dengue infection are believed to be at greater risk for developing dengue haemorrhagic fever. Doctors will usually diagnose the sort of dengue virus then begin to seem for signs of dengue haemorrhagic fever. Your doctor may do the following: check your vital sign, examine your skin, eyes, and glands, perform blood tests and coagulation studies, take a chest X-ray. Additionally to performing these tests, your doctor may ask you questions on your personal and family medical record. Your doctor may ask about your lifestyle and up to date travels. They’ll also attempt to rule out other conditions, like malaria, that are common in tropical regions. There is no specific treatment for dengue. Fever reducers and pain killers are often taken to regulate the symptoms of muscle aches and pains, and fever. The simplest options to treat these symptoms are acetaminophen or paracetamol. NSAIDs (Non- Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs), like ibuprofen and aspirin should be avoided. These anti-inflammatory drugs act by thinning the blood, and during a disease with risk of hemorrhage, blood thinners may exacerbate the prognosis. For severe dengue, medical aid by physicians and nurses experienced with the consequences and progression of the disease can save lives-decreasing mortality rates from quite 20% to but 1%. Maintenance of the patient's liquid body substance volume is critical to severe dengue care. Patients with dengue should seek medical advice upon the looks of warning signs. They should maintain proper hygiene and should consume healthy food with enough amount of liquid in their diet.

Get the App