Journal of Gastroenterology and Digestive Diseases

Case Report - Journal of Gastroenterology and Digestive Diseases (2018) Volume 3, Issue 1

Fibromatosis in a young woman: Clinical case.

Introduction: Desmoid tumors occur rarely in the general population, approximately 0.03% of all neoplasms and less than 3% of all soft tissue tumors. It is estimated that there is an incidence of spontaneous formation of 2 to 4 per million per year. Clinical case: A 21-year-old female patient referred to the outpatient clinic for a left-sided iliac fossa tumor for a year of slow-growing progression and currently causes pain on the middle and deep palpation. The physical examination shows a spindle-shaped tumor in the left iliac fossa, painful to the deep palpation and above the iliac bone. Ultrasound is obtained, which reports tumor in soft tissues of the abdominal wall in the right hypogastrium. Laboratory tests are requested which are normal and is involved for excision of the tumor which is preperitoneal located in the posterior abdominal aponeurosis which is completely removed. The histopathology report diagnoses fibromatosis. The patient is discharged without complications. Discussion: Musculoskeletal fibromatosis comprises a wide range of lesions with a common appearance. These can be divided into two main groups: superficial and deep. Surface fibromatosis is typically small, slow-growing and includes palmar fibromatosis, plantar fibromatosis, juvenile aponeurotic fibroma, and the infant digital fibroma. Deep fibromatosis is generally large, rapidly developing, and more aggressive. These include infantile miofibromatosis, colli fibromatosis, extra abdominal Desmoid tumor and aggressive childhood fibromatosis.

Author(s): Guillermo Padrón Arredondo*, Adianez Oramas Rojo

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