Biomedical Research

- Biomedical Research (2015) Volume 26, Issue 2

Correlation Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure after Acute Cervical Cord Trauma with Hyponatremia.

We aim to analyze the changes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and its relationship with hyponatremia after acute cervical cord trauma (ACCT). The medical records of 45 ACCT patients were reviewed from June 2011 to February 2013. They were divided to 3 groups: CSF pressure of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS), and non-concurring hyponatremia (NCH) group. Lumbar puncture and SPSS17.0 software were used to detect and analyze CSF pressure at 3 time slots (24 ~ 48 hours after injury, diagnosed hyponatremia before targeted treatment and curing hyponatremia in SIADH and CSWS groups; 24 ~ 48 hours after injury, 7-10 day after injury and discharged at hospital in NCH group) between groups and within groups during the pathologic process of ACCT. At the 1st time slot the SIADH group is higher than CSWS group and NCH group, whereas CSWS group is higher than NCH group, and the differences are significant (p<0.05). We observed the same tendency at the 2th time slot. At the 3th time lot there is no significant difference among 3 groups (p>0.05), neither do SIADH group at 1st and CSWS group at the 2th time slot. The data showed that the 2th slot is higher than the first and the third, whereas the first is higher than the third in SIADH group and CSWS group with statistically significance (p<0.05). There is no significant difference among the CSF pressure in 3 time slot within NCH group (p>0.05). Increasing CSF pressure might closely relate with the pathogenesis of SIADH during ACCT. Increasing CSF pressure after ACCT might combine with other factors and lead to SIADH. In addition, ACCT complicated with hyponatremia could cause CSF pressure increase.

Author(s): Qinxi Meng, Xin Liu, Fei Wang, Peng Yu, Qunqun Shan, Zhaohu Mao, Jian Li, Fan Zhang, Baolong Wang, Tingbao Zhao

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