Asian Journal of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

AN INVESTIGATION OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL LOCUS OF CONTROL MEASURES AND HOW THESE INFLUENCE HEALTH BELIEFS REGARDING WEIGHT CONTROL AND OBESITY IN TWO SOUTH WALES POPULATIONS

Joint Event on International Conference on OBESITY AND WEIGHT MANAGEMENT & International Conference on VACCINES AND IMMUNOLOGY
June 28-29, 2018 | Amsterdam, Netherlands

Rhiannon Harris

Cardiff Metropolitan University, UK

Scientific Tracks Abstracts : Asian J Biomed Pharmaceut Sci

DOI: 10.4066/2249-622X-C1-002

Abstract:

The Welsh Health Survey (2015) found that 59% of adults in Wales are either overweight or obese, with 24% being classified as obese. Obesity is a risk factor for a wide range of chronic conditions, diabetes, certain cancers, hypertension and is a preventable cause of disease and mortality (WHO, 2004). Data from the Welsh Health Survey (WHS) (2015) indicate that most adults in Cwm Taf are either overweight or obese. Rates of overweight and obesity in Merthyr Tydfil have increased to 67% and to 64% in Rhondda Cynon Taf from rates of 60% found in the previous 2010 WHS. In less deprived areas such as Monmouthshire and the Vale of Glamorgan rates of overweight and obesity are 53% and 52% respectively, these have not changed significantly since the 2010 Welsh Health Survey. Targeted weight loss programmes seem to be making little impact on the rates of obesity in these populations (James, 2016). Morrison et al (2010) found in Glasgow that individuals from the most deprived areas in a study were half as likely to lose weight and complete weight loss programmed compared to those from the most affluent areas. The reasons for this are not fully understood. It is important to investigate the relationships between locus of control, health beliefs and self-efficacy in relation to overweight or obesity and weight control to understand how it can be managed. A review by AbuSabha and Achterberg (1997) investigated papers on the relationship between self-efficacy and locus of control for nutrition and health related behaviour. Therefore, this review will focus on papers published since 1998, examining the tools and methods used to research these relationships.

Biography:

Rhiannon Harris is a Course Director and Senior Lecturer for the MSc/PG Diploma in dietetics course in Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has worked previously as a Clinician within NHS.

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