Biomedical Research

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.
Reach Us +1-504-608-2390

Perspective - Biomedical Research (2022) Advances in Health Science and Biotechnology Application: Edition: II

Translational biomedicine moving to proteomics.

Kiflay Mulugeta*

Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Adigrat University, Adigrat, Ethiopia

Corresponding Author:
Kiflay Mulugeta
Department of Biomedical Science
College of Medicine and Health Sciences
Adigrat University
Adigrat
Ethiopia

Accepted date: April 27, 2022

Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research

Abstract

Translational medicine becomes a discipline of medical research which aims to integrate basic research into patient treatment greater effectively. In the healthcare industry, translational medicine is now becoming particularly crucial. Translational medicine refers to the "translation" of basic research into practical therapy for real patients in the context of medication discovery and development.

About the Study

Translational medicine becomes a discipline of medical research which aims to integrate basic research into patient treatment greater effectively. In the healthcare industry, translational medicine is now becoming particularly crucial. Translational medicine refers to the "translation" of basic research into practical therapy for real patients in the context of medication discovery and development. The focus is on the connection between the laboratory and the patient's bedside, rather than on the actual disconnect [1]. The "bench to bedside" definition is commonly employed for Translational medicine and can also refer to the development and implementation of novel technologies, such as treatments, in a patient-centered environment, with an emphasis on early patient testing, evaluation, and management. Proteomics has firmly entrenched itself as a tool for solving challenges in biomedical research over the last decade. In fact, it is now widely regarded as a critical component of what is increasingly being referred to as "discovery science." Proteomics is poised to challenge other more popular techniques such as genomics and transcriptomics; especially to the depth and coverage that mass spectrometry can now offer. Almost every major biomedical research centre, at least in the industrialised world, has some type of proteomics facility, which is a strong indicator. It is also maturing as a field, with standards for data transmission and preservation being established, as well as criteria for duplicates and data analysis, as well as growing usage of high-resolution mass spectrometers [2,3].

Translation into clinical practise is one component of proteomics that has lagged behind. Given medicine's complex and tightly regulated nature, it's reasonable that this component would take longer. More and more publications outlining the use of proteomics for applications ranging from biomarkers to patient stratification have recently been published in the field of translational proteomics. The utilisation of proteome profiling for cancer biomarker identification, robotic processing of samples for Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) tests, and superbinder SH2- domains for phosphotyrosine profiling are the driving Technologies for Translational Proteomics. Multiplexed techniques for MRM analysis of plasma or saliva, as well as a unique approach for detecting cysteine-containing phosphopeptides, are among the research publications. More research publications describe their findings from proteomic analyses of various tumour types in the Cancer Signatures and Biomarkers section. Translational medicine, on the other hand, is a critical cutting-edge tool for diagnosing patient disease [4]. Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) on triple quadrupole instruments and Parallel Reaction Monitoring (PRM) on instruments with high resolution detectors such as Quadrupole Time-of- Flight (Q-TOF) and Orbitrap type instruments is a final approach for validating biomarkers. These are known as targeted methods because they use a target list that includes the chromatographic retention time and m/z of each target. For MS/MS identification and quantitation, only those targets are chosen. A combination method may be a better way for detecting, quantifying, and validating more proteins in plasma [5]. When DIA is combined with targeted proteomic analysis, more detailed results may be obtained [6].

Conclusion

Translational proteomics' major purpose is the capacity to analyse 100 samples of depleted plasma every day is a significant step forward, even more comprehensive coverage of the plasma proteome, preferably without the depletion stage, would be desirable. Ongoing research is aimed at detecting and quantifying more than 1000 proteins in a plasma sample in less than 30 minutes at a low cost per sample. If that goal is met, systematic longitudinal monitoring of the plasma proteome in a large population could be utilised to correlate changes in the plasma proteome with illness onset. This should make it possible to find and validate biomarker panels for a variety of diseases at the same time.

References

Get the App