Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Allied Science

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Commentary - Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Allied Science (2022) Volume 6, Issue 5

Significance of care in farms and poultry chickens feather loss

Lindsey Wilson*

Department of Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom

Corresponding Author:
Lindsey Wilson
Department of Veterinary Science
University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: 31-Aug-2022, Manuscript No. AAVMAS-22-78048; Editor assigned: 02-Sep-2022, PreQC No. AAVMAS-22-78048(PQ); Reviewed: 16-Aug-2022, QC No. AAVMAS-22-78048; Revised: 21-Sep-2022, Manuscript No. AAVMAS-22-78048(R); Published: 28-Sep-2022, DOI:10.35841/2591-7978-6.5.123

Citation: Wilson L. Significance of care in farms and poultry chickens feather loss. J Vet Med Allied Sci. 2022;6(5):123

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On birds, feathers play crucial roles in the body's insulation and protection. Too much feather loss increases the likelihood that injuries to the exposed flesh will result in infections or tissue damage. Additionally, excessive feather loss may increase the amount of energy needed to keep body temperature constant. As a result, birds that have lost a lot of feathers frequently need more food to produce the energy needed to make up for the heat that was lost from the exposed parts. Have a sufficient supply of calcium and other minerals needed for the wellbeing of the poultry animals when taking care of a poultry farm. Maintaining a clean environment will help to ensure that the farm's birds are healthy.

Feather pulling and pecking by other flock members can occasionally be linked to feather loss in birds. As insufficient food intake might cause this kind of behaviour, poor nutrition may also be to blame. However, if the proper feed is being given yet feather loss is happening, it can be the consequence of aggressive behaviour on the part of some flock members [1]. It is common for one or a few flock members to engage in feather picking and tugging, which can be learned behaviour. Because they are naturally curious creatures, birds will eat things that catch their attention. If they start picking or pulling at the feathers of their flock mates, it might develop a behaviour that spreads to the rest of the flock. At different ages, birds require varied amounts of protein and calories. Early on, when their growth is the fastest, meat birds need higher levels of protein. Their need for protein to maintain body weight and feather growth decrease as they mature.

Proteins, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals must be consumed in sufficient proportions for healthy feather growth and maintenance. Inadequate feeding is frequently the cause of feathering issues in backyard flocks. A well-balanced poultry feed designed for the right age and type of bird will guarantee that the flock is getting the nutrients it needs to promote healthy feather growth. The optimum feeding plans for your flocks are provided by diets designed specifically for egg or meat production and for the appropriate age of the bird [2]. At different ages, birds require varied amounts of protein and calories. For instance, meat birds need more protein in the early stages of development when they are growing the fastest. Their need for protein to maintain body weight and feather growth decrease as they mature. In order to prevent heat stress in poultry, it is important to understand that as air temperature and humidity levels rise uncontrollably, so do the birds' core body temperatures. The effects of heat stress can include panting, increased water consumption, and even death. Birds can benefit from access to fresh, cool water, ventilation, and altered feeding patterns [3].

A natural process called moulting causes laying birds to stop producing eggs and lose feathers from their neck, breast, and back for a few weeks to a few months. In natural settings where the birds are exposed to regular day lengths, moulting happens most frequently. Moult will begin to develop in the fall when the amount of daylight decreases. It's nature's method of giving laying birds some downtime before the springtime stimulant that will maximise their reproductive capacity [4]. Feather loss can also be a sign of poor health or a stressful environment for the bird. For your flock, it can be crucial to employ optimum management methods and keep an eye out for potential disease issues in your birds. Stressful situations can cause feather loss and poor feather quality in birds, including heat, cold, illness, and insufficient nutrition and water [5]. In a poultry farm, proper management procedures must be followed to ensure a high supply of meat and eggs. To ensure that the birds remain healthy and disease-free and can produce their goods to the fullest extent possible, it is necessary to provide them with adequate shelter, food, and living circumstances in addition to sufficient medical treatment.

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