Journal of Environmental Waste Management and Recycling

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Opinion Article - Journal of Environmental Waste Management and Recycling (2021) Volume 4, Issue 4

Recyclable Construction Waste

Harriet Wood*

Managing Editor, Journal of Environmental Waste Management and Recycling, United Kingdom

Corresponding Author:
Harriet Wood
Managing Editor
Journal of Environmental Waste Management and Recycling
United Kingdom
Email: [email protected]

Accepted date: September 02, 2021

Citation:Wood H.Recyclable construction waste.Environ Waste Management Recycling 2021.4(4):2

Abstract

Construction trash has wreaked havoc on the environment in a number of major cities. Because massive amounts of infrastructure and development work have been completed, the number of demolished structures is likewise rising. There is a shortage of landfills as the demand for disposal locations for never-ending destroyed garbage grows. As a result, minimising trash output has become a global priority. It is the obligation of the construction industry to guarantee that its actions and products comply with environmental legislation and good environmental practises through reducing waste.

Introduction

Construction trash has wreaked havoc on the environment in a number of major cities. Because massive amounts of infrastructure and development work have been completed, the number of demolished structures is likewise rising. There is a shortage of landfills as the demand for disposal locations for never-ending destroyed garbage grows. As a result, minimising trash output has become a global priority. It is the obligation of the construction industry to guarantee that its actions and products comply with environmental legislation and good environmental practises through reducing waste. The most effective strategy to deal with material waste is to avoid it in the first place. The difficulty of defining a technique and using that methodology to benchmark future building projects is one of the primary roadblocks to waste minimization on a construction site. McGrath introduced a waste minimization system called Site Methodology to Audit Reduced Target Waste (SMART Waste) for auditing, reducing, and targeting waste arising on construction sites for improving material recovery for reusing and reducing waste arising on future sites in order to overcome this shortage. Audited waste arising is utilised as a baseline when implementing the systems. Despite the fact that recycling and sustainable resource use are increasingly promoted in construction activities, and efforts have been made in particular to recycle materials such as concrete, mortar, steel, and soil, there have been few studies demonstrating the effectiveness of these implementation measures.

Any material by-product of human and industrial activity that has no residual value is defined as waste. According to the Environmental Protection Department, construction and demolition activities generate roughly 38 percent of total waste, or 6,408 tonnes of trash each year. Despite the substantial pollution caused by construction operations, every construction site urgently requires a robust construction waste management system. It is critical to structure approaches to reduce waste generation, as this is viewed as the most desirable answer to any waste problem. Indeed, every construction company should be required to implement a construction waste management plan customised to its specific mode of operation, so that all employees, from management to operational, are working toward the same aim of construction waste management. The economic and environmental benefits of waste minimization are significant, since it will assist both the environment and construction companies in terms of cost savings. The economic benefits of waste minimization include the ability to sell particular waste materials and the free or low-cost removal of other garbage from facilities, resulting in a reduction in materials going to landfill. As a result, it can boost contractors' competitiveness by lowering production costs and improving their public image. Few contractors, on the other hand, have made an effort to think about the environment and develop strategies for reducing construction waste. Because contractors place a high value on timeliness in their projects, their efforts are constantly focused on completing projects as quickly as possible, rather than on the environment. Their books are unable to disclose possible savings from the decrease of building waste. Building material waste management can actually increase construction productivity, save time, and improve safety, but excess trash requires additional time and resources for disposal, thereby slowing down construction progress.

While environmental conservation has become increasingly important around the world, high energy consumption and pollution from construction operations appear to be uncontrollable. Construction measures such as reusing, recycling, and minimising construction materials have been promoted and advised.

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