Journal of Parasitic Diseases: Diagnosis and Therapy

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Editorial - Journal of Parasitic Diseases: Diagnosis and Therapy (2021) Volume 6, Issue 4

Porcine cysticercosis: An infection in mozambique.

Shawn Kruger*

Editorial Office, Journal of Parasitic Diseases: Diagnosis and Therapy, London, United Kingdom

Corresponding Author:
Shawn Kruger
Editorial Office
London
United Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]

Accepted date: July 10, 2021

Citation: Kruger S.Porcine cysticercosis: An infection in mozambique.J Parasit Dis Diagn Ther 2021;6(4):2

Abstract

Porcine cysticercosis is a pig illness caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium, which causes taeniosis in humans. In many impoverished nations, Taenia solium is a major zoonosis. Cysticercosis is a significant public health threat that also costs the pig industry a lot of money. The current study was undertaken to assess the incidence and risk factors for swine cysticercosis in Mozambique since data on the epidemiology of porcine cysticercosis in the country is limited. A total of 661 pigs were tested serologically and inspected by tongue examination between September and November 2007. A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect circulating parasite antigen in serum samples. The illness is widespread in pigs from many poor nations across the world, posing a severe public health threat and causing huge economic losses in the swine industry.

Editorial

Porcine cysticercosis is a pig illness caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium, which causes taeniosis in humans. In many impoverished nations, Taenia solium is a major zoonosis. Cysticercosis is a significant public health threat that also costs the pig industry a lot of money. The current study was undertaken to assess the incidence and risk factors for swine cysticercosis in Mozambique since data on the epidemiology of porcine cysticercosis in the country is limited. A total of 661 pigs were tested serologically and inspected by tongue examination between September and November 2007. A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect circulating parasite antigen in serum samples. The illness is widespread in pigs from many poor nations across the world, posing a severe public health threat and causing huge economic losses in the swine industry. There is little information on the disease's incidence in Mozambique. Pigs serve as typical intermediate hosts, containing the larval cysticerci, while humans serve as definitive hosts, containing the adult tapeworm that causes taeniosis. By inadvertently ingesting T. solium eggs, humans can potentially function as intermediate hosts and produce the cystic form. Neurocysticercosis is a kind of human cysticercosis that produces a variety of neurological symptoms, the most frequent of which are seizures caused by cysts in the brain. Taenia solium cysticercosis is common in people and pigs in many underdeveloped nations in Latin America, Asia, and Africa, where the disease's life cycle is perpetuated by the cohabitation of inadequate sanitation and swine being allowed to roam freely.

Cysticercosis has been described as endemic in regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. This illness is a major but under-appreciated public health issue that results in significant economic losses owing to the rejection of contaminated swine. Pig farming is mostly carried out by smallholders in Mozambique under a variety of situations, the majority of which rely on scavenging for food. Primitive housing is usually given in this method to protect the animals just at night. Furthermore, pig slaughtering facilities are few, and pork inspection and supervision are inadequate. The survival and spread of T. solium are aided by these circumstances. The existence of T. solium cysticercosis in Mozambique has been verified in a few investigations in individuals with neurological disorders and in a serological survey of pigs using an antibody ELISA test, which revealed a prevalence range of 6.5%-33.3% in 11 districts of Tete province. Additionally, cysticercosis in pigs has been documented in all regions of the nation, according to ancient slaughterhouse records. The current data suggest that porcine cysticercosis is endemic in the area, and that rising pig age and pig husbandry techniques have a substantial role in the spread of porcine cysticercosis. To allow the gathering of additional baseline data and the implementation of effective control methods in Mozambique, further epidemiological research on the prevalence and transmission of porcine cysticercosis in rural areas are needed.

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