Biomedical Research

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Pathogens and antibiotic resistance of children with community-acquired pneumonia

Objective: To investigate the pathogens and antibiotic resistance of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in children under 5 y old in our hospital during the recent two years.

Methods: 759 CAP patients in our hospital from October 2015 to July 2017 were analysed. The sputum samples of CAP patients were collected. The pathogens and antibiotic resistance were detected.

Results: In the 759 cases, 296 specific pathogens were identified in 265 cases (34.91%), included 119 (40.2%) ones of gram-positive (G+) bacteria and 177 (59.8%) ones of gram-negative (G-) bacteria. The most main G+ bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (17.23%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9.12%). The most main G- bacteria were E. coli (24.32%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.46%). The antibiotic resistances of Staphylococcus aureus to penicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin were high. The antibiotic resistances of Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin were high. The antibiotic resistances of Staphylococcus haemolyticus to penicillin and tetracycline were high. The antibiotic resistances of E. coli to ampicillin, gentamicin, piperacillin and ciprofloxacin were high. The antibiotic resistances of Klebsiella pneumoniae to ampicillin and gentamicin were high. The antibiotic resistances of Enterobacter cloacae to amoxicillin and cefazolin were high. The antibiotic resistances of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ceftriaxone, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were high.

Conclusion: It’s suggested that the isolating rate of G- bacteria could be higher than G+ bacteria in our hospital, which have the different resistance characteristics to general antibiotics.

Author(s): Ma Jinghua, Liu Gaizhuang, Chai Qiaoli