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A Rare Case of a Giant Cervical Osteochondroma.

Background: Osteochondroma or osteocartolaginous exostosis is the most common benign tumor of bone. They account for 35% to 50% of benign bone neoplasms and 10% to 15% of all primary bone tumors. Usually these tumors are found in the appendicular skeleton, especially in the metadiaphyseal region of long bones. Spinal osteochondromas, however, are uncommon especially at cervical level. Clinical presentation: We report the case of a 16 year old boy presenting a hard, gradually progressing, large swelling mass, over the posterior part of the neck causing pain. Radiological images revealed a giant solitary osteochondroma arising from C3 to C6 laminae. The patient underwent complete surgical excision of the tumor. Postoperative outcome was good and recovery from the pain achieved. Conclusion: Solitary osteochondroma of the cervical spine is a rare manifestation of a common bony tumor. Patients affected may present with a multitude of symptoms and complications depending on the size and location of the lesion. Advanced imaging modalities are required for characterization, diagnosis, surgical planning and management of these rare cervical lesions.

Author(s): Alessandro Villa, Domenico Gerardo Iacopino, Francesca Graziano, Carlo Gulì, Antonella Giugno, Luigi Basile, Rosario Maugeri