Allied Journal of Medical Research

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Editorial - Allied Journal of Medical Research (2021) Volume 5, Issue 3

Overview of bone mass.

Specker Ben*

Department of Child Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

Corresponding Author:
Specker B
Department of Child Health
University of Glasgow
Glasgow
UK
E-mail: [email protected]

Accepted date: May 14, 2021

Citation: Ben S. Overview of bone mass. Allied J Med Res. 2021;5(3).

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Editorial

Bone mass, or the quantity of bone tissue in the skeleton, can continue to expand into the late 20s. Peak bone mass refers to when bones have reached their maximal strength and density. Between the ages of 30 and menopause, women's overall bone mass tends to remain relatively constant. The amount of bone mineral in bone tissue is measured by bone density, often known as bone mineral density (BMD). Although clinically assessed by proxy according to optical density per square centimetre of bone surface upon imaging, the concept is of mineral mass per volume of bone (related to density in the physics sense). In clinical medicine, bone density assessment is used as an indirect indicator of osteoporosis and fracture risk. It is determined by a process known as densitometry, which is frequently conducted in radiology or nuclear medicine departments of hospitals or clinics. The procedure is painless and non-invasive, with minimal radiation exposure. The most usual measurements are taken over the lumbar spine and the upper region of the hip. If the hip and lumbar spines are not accessible, the forearm can be scanned. There is a statistical link between low bone density and an increased risk of fracture. Fall-related fractures of the legs and pelvis are a major public health issue, particularly among elderly women, resulting in high medical costs, incapacity to live independently, and even death. Bone density measurements are used to assess people for osteoporosis risk and to determine who would benefit from bone-strengthening therapies.

Strong bones are required. Bone mass will typically increase till about the age of 30. However, it would gradually decrease after that. That does not have to be as difficult as it appears. If you take care of your bones, they will most likely remain dense enough to prevent problems. You're at risk if they degenerate too quickly, or if you already had inadequate bone mass. Bone problems don't show up until it's too late. As a result, it's a good idea to keep track of your bone mass and see how you're doing. It is critical that your bones remain as strong as possible. Fortunately, there are several things you can do to keep your bones strong and healthy. The action of vitamin D is hampered by alcohol. Caffeine interferes with calcium's ability to execute its work correctly. Don't worry, you don't have to give up alcohol or coffee completely. When you use something a lot, it has a negative impact on your bone mass. You should be ok if you limit your coffee and alcohol consumption. Smoking reduces bone mass by preventing the body from effectively absorbing calcium. If you're a smoker, this should be on your list of reasons to quit. You can't tell how strong your bones are unless you measure them. You can use a Tanita body composition monitor to achieve this at home. Our bathroom scales use a very modest electric current to send a signal through your body. The scale can then compute your bone mass because bones, fat, muscle, and other tissue all conduct electricity at different rates. Of course, there are other measures you should be aware of in order to determine whether or not you are healthy. A Tanita weighing scale can also tell you how much muscle you have, how much visceral fat you have, how much body fat you have, and how much body water you have. It can then use this information to assess your health and advise you on what you should focus on.

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