Virology Research Journal

Research Article - Virology Research Journal (2018) Volume 2, Issue 1

Behavioral practices preventing malaria disease infection/transmission among adult in Sokoto metropolis

Malaria disease a public health concern which WHO estimates that more than 90% of the 1.5 to 2.0 million deaths due to malaria disease worldwide. These necessitated the research in the behavioral practices that prevent malaria disease infection/transmission, since disease prevention is cost effective than treatment. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistic of frequency count, normative percentage and grand mean; as well as inferential statistics of chi-square (χ2). The level of significant was fixed at 0.05. Appropriate degrees of freedom were worked out. A cross-sectional form of descriptive survey research design was used for this study. This is because descriptive studies are used when the characteristics of a population are either unknown or partially known, this justified the use of similar design in a study of similar nature. Two hundred and seventy (270) copies (90%) of structured interview distributed out of three hundred (300) copies were returned and used for data analysis. In the behavioral practices preventing malaria infection/transmission, among the statistical calculated chi-square (χ2=13269, is greater than the tabulated χ2=32.671 at df=21, p<0.05). Therefore, the null hypotheses were rejected, and conclusion drawn that there is a significant difference between male and female respondents in the behavioral practices preventing malaria infection/transmission. The male exhibited good behavioral practices preventing malaria infection/transmission than the female gender. Influence of age groups on the behavioral practices preventing malaria infection/transmission, showed a statistical significance of calculated chi-square (χ2=12764.8, is greater than the tabulated χ2=61.63 at df=49, p<0.05). Therefore, the null hypotheses were rejected, and conclusion drawn that there is a significant difference between the different age groups in the behavioral practices preventing malaria infection/transmission. Influence of educational level on the behavioral practices preventing malaria disease infection/transmission, showed statistical significance, the calculated chi-square (χ2=12384 is greater than the tabulated χ2=61.63 at df=49, p<0.05). Therefore, the null hypotheses were rejected, and conclusion drawn that there is a significant difference between the different educational level on the behavioral practices preventing malaria disease infection/ transmission. There was influence age, gender and educational level on behavioral practices preventing malaria disease infection/transmission. The behavioral practices preventing malaria disease infection/transmission among the subject was not generally good across the ages, gender and educational level hence the control of malaria disease is impeded.

Author(s): Ikpeama Osita John, Onuzulike N, Ikpeama CA, Ikpeama CJ, Igbineweka OO, Ikpeama EA, Ofuenyi J, Gerald CM

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