Journal of Translational Research

Guidelines for Authors

Journal of Translational Research delivers original investigations in the broad fields of laboratory, clinical, and public health research. It keeps readers up-to-date on significant biomedical research from all subspecialties of medicine. Interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary in scope, it aims to expedite the translation of scientific discovery into new or improved standards of care and promotes a wide-ranging exchange between basic, preclinical, clinical, epidemiologic, and health outcomes research.

It encourages submission of studies describing preclinical research with potential for application to human disease, and studies describing research obtained from preliminary human experimentation with potential to refine the understanding of biological principles underpinning human disease. Also encouraged are studies describing public health research with potential for application to the clinic, disease prevention, or healthcare policy.

You may submit manuscripts online at Submission Portal or you may send the article as an email attachment to [email protected] or [email protected]

Publication Policies and Procedures:

Research papers published both in electronic and print versions of Current Trends in Translational may be freely viewed/ copied/ and printed by individual academicians and researchers Declaration of originality, authorship and competing interest on behalf of all authors of the manuscript. This manuscript is based on original work and had not been published in whole or part, in any print or electronic media or is under consideration of publication in any print or electronic media other than as abstract of conference proceedings. Persons designated as authors must meet all of the following criteria.

Preparation of Manuscripts:

Manuscripts should consist of the following subdivisions: Title page, Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results/Observations, Discussion, Acknowledgements, References, Tables, Figures and Legends. All manuscripts should be written in English and number all the pages consecutively beginning with the title page. The original copy of the manuscript along with figures should be sent to the editorial online at http://www.editorialmanager.com/alliedjournals/Default.aspx or as an email attachment to above given email-id's No need to send hard copies of the manuscripts if they have already been sent through e-mail.

Review Process:

All journal submissions are double blind, peer reviewed by members of the Editorial Review Board. First, the journal Editor reviews papers for appropriateness, and uses a plagiarism verification tool to ensure the work has not been plagiarized. Then the Editor sends out the manuscript to two reviewers, without disclosing the identities of the authors or other reviewer. The review results are confidentially delivered to the Editor, who then reviews the reviewer feedback to ensure the comments are relevant and non-discriminatory before sending the comments back to the authors. Authors are given a chance to make revisions to their manuscripts based on the feedback they receive. Revised papers are sent back to the Editors who send the revised paper back to the original reviewers. Feedback from the second round of reviews are processed the same way. In rare cases, authors are given a second chance to revise and resubmit their papers should they not be found acceptable after the first revision.

Authors' Warranty and Publication Agreement and Copyright Assignment:

All authors of accepted manuscripts warrant that the manuscript is original and has not been submitted for publication or published elsewhere. All of the authors further warrant that, where necessary, they have obtained necessary releases from companies or individuals involved in or with the manuscript. All authors further warrant that the undersigned are the sole authors of this work. All authors hereby authorize the Allied Academies to publish the manuscript in the aforementioned Journal and, in consideration of the publication of the manuscript, agree to hold the Allied Academies, its assigns, affiliates, subsidiaries, officers, employees, directors and agents harmless and agree to defend the Allied Academies, its assigns, affiliates, subsidiaries, officers, employees, directors and agents in any action for damages which might arise as a direct or indirect result of the publication of the manuscript and to defend the Allied Academies, its assigns, affiliates, subsidiaries, officers, employees, directors and agents from third party liability associated with the manuscript and its publication.

Page charge:

Each page (A4) will be charged to authors at €100.00. For each image additional €50.00 will be charged to the authors for research article only. Additional fee will be applicable for articles which requires high level editing (Eg: articles with complex equations, flow charts and tables) and language polishing. Payment may be made before publishing the manuscript/s. Article Processing Charge for the rest of Manuscripts is €519. 

Types of Manuscripts:

Theoretical and Empirical Manuscripts
The Allied Academies affiliates which handle theoretical and empirical manuscripts can be found on our Journal Matrix. These editorial guidelines reflect the Academies' policy with regard to reviewing theoretical and empirical manuscripts for publication and presentation in each of these affiliates. The primary criterion upon which manuscripts are judged is whether the research advances the discipline. The specific guidelines which are followed by referees is displayed on the following page. It shows the areas of evaluation to which each manuscript is subjected. Key points include currency, interest, and relevancy. 

Educational and Pedagogic Manuscripts
The Allied Academies affiliates which handle educational and pedagogic manuscripts can be found on our Journal Matrix. These editorial guidelines reflect the Academies' policy with regard to reviewing educational and pedagogic manuscripts for publication and presentation in each of these affiliates. The primary criterion upon which manuscripts are judged is whether the research advances the teaching profession. The specific guidelines which are followed by referees is displayed on the following page. It shows the areas of evaluation to which each manuscript is subjected. Key points include currency, interest, relevancy and usefulFness to educators. In order for educational or pedagogic manuscripts to be useful to educators, they must address appropriate literature to support conclusions, teaching methodologies or pedagogies. Consequently, referees pay particular attention to completeness of literature review and appropriateness of conclusions drawn from that review. 

Cases

The International Academy for Case Studies is the Allied Academies affiliate which handles cases, publishes proceedings and the Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies. These editorial guidelines reflect the Academy's policy with regard to reviewing cases for publication and presentation. The Academy is interested in cases in any discipline, any area, and any subject. Cases may be any length and any level of difficulty. The Academy strongly believes that any subject and any course can benefit from well prepared cases. To that end, we judge submissions to conferences and for journal consideration on the value of the case as a teaching tool. Cases may be presented in narrative style or in dialogue. The case should provide sufficient information to be able to accomplish the case objectives, and should be written in a fashion to draw and hold student attention. Cases should focus upon a decision point and should lead a reader to a point at which some decision or series of strategies must be developed. The student's task should be to analyze the case and any outside information which is pertinent and to formulate a course of action. Referees will be most concerned about the development of a strong decision point. Cases must be accompanied by an Instructor's Note, which will be described in following sections.

Case Description

The primary subject matter of this case concerns (choose one discipline or subject). Secondary issues examined include (list as many secondary issues as the case contains). The case has a difficulty level of (choose one of the following: one, appropriate for freshman level courses; two, appropriate for sophomore level courses; three, appropriate for junior level courses; four, appropriate for senior level courses; five, appropriate for first year graduate students; six, appropriate for second year graduate students; seven, appropriate for doctoral students). The case is designed to be taught in (indicate how many) class hours and is expected to require (indicate how many) hours of outside preparation by students.

Information about the Case Synopsis

The Editors encourage authors to be creative in this section. Use of selected dialogue from the case, comments about class usefulness or student responses to use of the case, or any other information which authors feel is valuable may be used. The synopses should capture the attention and interest of users. The synopsis should follow the format described in the following section.

Case Synopsis

In this section, present a brief overview of the case. The synopsis should be a maximumof 300 words. Be creative. This section will be the primary selling point of your case. Use this section to sell your case.

Body of the Case

The body of the case should follow the synopsis. This section should use headings to divide the case as appropriate. The body should be well organized and flow through to the decision point and the closure of the case.

Instractor's Notes:

Instructor's Notes may be the most important aspect of a case. They lead an instructor through the case and support the design and execution of the teaching of the case. They should be designed for less experienced case users and should make teaching the case an interesting and successful process. The note should conform to a standard approach and should contain sections as described in the following subheadings.Case Notes should begin with a repeat of the case title and authors. The Note should include a description of the case and present any pertinent information about the case or how it was developed. Explain how the case might be used in a class and discuss specific strategies and recommendations for teaching approaches, student assignments, or presentation methods.

CASE OVERVIEW

The Note should continue with a case overview. Describe for the instructor what the case contains, point out pertinent information or issues, and review the material presented. This is an important aspect of the Note because it allows instructors to see what students should be extracting as they read the case.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Some users like to have questions included in a case to start discussion. Others like to devise their own approach to using an individual case. Consequently, the Editors recommend that discussion questions appear in the Instructor's Note. This allows a case user to make an individual choice about utilizing or assigning questions. Present questions which can be used as student assignments or in class discussions of the case. For each question, provide an answeror response. Arrange the questions so that answers immediately follow each question. Discussion questions often take the form of an analysis. Financial analyses, environmental analyses, market assessments, etc., frequently are valuable aspects of teaching a case. If an analytic question is posed, case authors should include complete analyses as the answer for that question. For open ended or broad discussion questions, include possible answers or responses which could occur and describe how such questions can be used in the classroom.

ADDITIONAL EXHIBITS

If additional information is provided, such as industry notes, industry averages, comparison data, etc., include it in the Note as exhibits. Explain the information included, and describe its use in teaching the case.

Epilogue:

If appropriate, include an epilogue which describes what actually happened or displays any information which you think might be of interest to instructors or students. An epilogue might not be appropriate for all cases, so feel free to omit this section.

Referee Guidelines

The exhibit on the following page displays the referee guidelines for reviewing cases and instructor's notes. As the guidelines suggest, primary importance is placed on readability, interest, and usefulness as a teaching tool.

Referee Support

As the last question on the referee guidelines suggests, we ask referees to be as specific as possible in indicating what must be done to make a case acceptable for journal publication. This embodies a primary objective of the Academy: to assist authors in the research process. Our Editorial Policy is one which is supportive, rather than critical. We encourage all authors who are not successful in a first attempt to rewrite the manuscript in accordance with the suggestions of the referees. We will be pleased to referee future versions and rewrites of manuscripts and work with authors in achieving their research goals.

Additional Policies:

Discontinued Journals

Journals that become discontinued for any reason will remain archived on the Journal's website indefinitely. These discontinued journals will be open to the general public and continue to be available in various indexes and repositories.

Retractions and Corrections

Should any paper need to be removed from a Journal that has already been published, that paper will be removed from the PDF version of the Journal in such a way that it does not change the page numbers of other papers published in that issue of the Journal. The authors of the removed manuscript may be subject to republication fees (if applicable). Corrected versions of the Journal will be made available on the Journal website, as well as all applicable indexes.

Corrections that need to be made to an already published Journal will be handled in such a way that it does not affect any of the other papers published in that issue. If the correction stems from author error, a republication fee may apply. Corrections due to publisher error will be handled without charge. Corrected versions of the Journal will be made available on the Journal website, as well as all applicable indexes.

Advertising

Decisions regarding advertising in a Journal are made by the Executive Director. Advertising that may be suitable include, but are not limited to: Higher education institutions, research organizations, publishing companies, academic organizations, writing assistance and translation services, journal indexing companies, conference organizers, event coordinators and the like. Types of advertising currently accepted include image and text ads placed on the Journal website, as well as image and text ads included in the body of the Journal itself.

Ethics:

When reporting experiments on human subjects, indicate whether the procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional or regional) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000 (http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/). Do not use patients' names, initials, or hospital numbers, especially in illustrative material. When reporting experiments on animals, indicate whether the institution’s or a national research council's guide for, or any national law on the care and use of laboratory animals was followed. Statistics When possible, quantify findings and present them with appropriate indicators of measurement error or uncertainty (such as confidence intervals). Report losses to observation (such as dropouts from a clinical trial). Put a general description of methods in the Methods section. When data are summarized in the Results section, specify the statistical methods used to analyse them. Avoid non-technical uses of technical terms in statistics, such as 'random' (which implies a randomising device), 'normal', 'significant', 'correlations', and 'sample'. Define statistical terms, abbreviations, and most symbols.

Statistics:

When possible, quantify findings and present them with appropriate indicators of measurement error or uncertainty (such as confidence intervals). Report losses to observation (such as dropouts from a clinical trial). Put a general description of methods in the Methods section. When data are summarized in the Results section, specify the statistical methods used to analyse them. Avoid non-technical uses of technical terms in statistics, such as 'random' (which implies a randomising device), 'normal', 'significant', 'correlations', and 'sample'. Define statistical terms, abbreviations, and most symbols and also we provide some diffrent sevices like wise Subscription, Conferences and e-books.